Rustic Buttermilk Soda Bread with Oats

Yields6 Servings
10

Get ready for a life-changing baking experience as you discover the magic and simplicity of Soda Bread! This incredibly tasty and easy-to-make bread has been delighting taste buds ever since its birth in the mid-19th century in Ireland. The secret ingredient that makes this bread so scrumptious and straightforward to prepare? Baking soda, of course!

As the Irish stumbled upon baking soda as a leavening agent, replacing the traditional yeast, they unlocked the door to a world of flavorful, quick, and comforting bread-making. The reaction between baking soda and an acidic ingredient like buttermilk, yogurt, or vinegar creates a delightful rise, resulting in a soft, tender crumb with a slightly tangy taste. In addition, the bread's golden, rustic crust offers a perfect balance of texture that adds to its charm.

What makes Soda Bread so unique is its remarkable ease of preparation. There's no need to wait hours for the dough to rise or fuss over complicated kneading techniques. Instead, just the ingredients, shape the dough and pop it in the oven. You'll have a warm, freshly baked loaf with your favourite spread, a hearty soup, or a delicious stew in less than an hour.

Not only is Soda Bread incredibly tasty, but it's also versatile. The basic recipe can be tweaked with add-ins, like dried fruits, nuts, seeds, or herbs, to create your signature loaf. The possibilities are endless, allowing you to explore your culinary creativity and savour the delicious outcome.

So, what are you waiting for? Embrace the joy of baking Soda Bread, and delight in the savoury simplicity that has captured hearts (and stomachs) since the Irish first introduced this incredible treat. Trust us; you'll be hooked!

INGREDIENTS

 Butter (for oiling the potjie)
 3 cups Nutty Wheat flour (or wholewheat flour)
 1 cup oats
 1 tsp baking soda
 1 tsp salt
 1 bottle buttermilk (2 cups)

DIRECTIONS

1

Build a medium-sized fire on your braai and let it burn down to coals. You want enough coals to cover the bottom and top of your potjie. Alternatively use briquettes which is sometimes easier when you want to control the heat.

2

In the meantime, generously smear the inside of your flat-bottomed potjie or camp oven with butter or line them with baking paper.

3

Add the buttermilk and stir with a wooden spoon until everything is combined. Do not knead the dough.

4

Flop the dough into the prepared potjie, dust the top of the bread with some extra flour, and use a sharp knife to cut a cross in the top of the bread.

5

After 45 minutes, remove the lid, taking care not to spill too much ash onto the bread. Insert the tip of a knife into the bread, and if it comes out clean, the bread is ready.

6

If the bread does not stick to the potjie, great. If it sticks to the bottom of the potjie, don't worry. Take a spatula, go in on the lines of the cross you cut earlier, and take it out in quarters.

Notes:

  • Although you can use plain white flour, we prefer the taste and coarse texture of wholewheat and oats.
  • This bread is perfect to enjoy with a jar of jam from a farm stall or market and can feed 6-8 people.
  • This recipe works with any combination of 4 cups of flour, and you can experiment with different types of flour to your liking.

GALLERY

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Ingredients

 Butter (for oiling the potjie)
 3 cups Nutty Wheat flour (or wholewheat flour)
 1 cup oats
 1 tsp baking soda
 1 tsp salt
 1 bottle buttermilk (2 cups)

Directions

1

Build a medium-sized fire on your braai and let it burn down to coals. You want enough coals to cover the bottom and top of your potjie. Alternatively use briquettes which is sometimes easier when you want to control the heat.

2

In the meantime, generously smear the inside of your flat-bottomed potjie or camp oven with butter or line them with baking paper.

3

Add the buttermilk and stir with a wooden spoon until everything is combined. Do not knead the dough.

4

Flop the dough into the prepared potjie, dust the top of the bread with some extra flour, and use a sharp knife to cut a cross in the top of the bread.

5

After 45 minutes, remove the lid, taking care not to spill too much ash onto the bread. Insert the tip of a knife into the bread, and if it comes out clean, the bread is ready.

6

If the bread does not stick to the potjie, great. If it sticks to the bottom of the potjie, don't worry. Take a spatula, go in on the lines of the cross you cut earlier, and take it out in quarters.

Rustic Buttermilk Soda Bread with Oats
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